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9 Of The Most Powerful Photo Stories On The Internet This Week

This week marked the beginning of celebrating Black History Month, after a year when race was brought to the forefront of the news. Here at BuzzFeed News, we’ll be highlighting Black stories all month. We spoke with Antwaun Sargent, one of the art world’s best-known critics, about five Black photographers who influenced him. We also looked at a new book from Amani Willett about the Black experience on the road, and loved the work of Tayo Adekunle in the British Journal of Photography.

If you live in the Northeast or the Midwest of the United States, then you probably spent a lot of time digging yourself out of the snow this week. It was beautiful while it fell, and then almost immediately overwhelming to anyone biking, driving, or walking through it. We looked at some of the best pictures from the snowstorm from different cities affected this past week. We also loved the wordk of a young photographer who documented the destruction of Indigenous land by drone. As Jeff Bezos steps down as Amazon’s CEO, we looked back on 26 years of his reign. And we rewind 100 years to look at the work of woman photographer Madame d’Ora, who photographed high society in the 1920s. Debsuddha Banerjee photographed his albino aunts in India — two women who were secluded in isolation long before the pandemic. Lastly, how does a zoo provide for its animals when there are no visitors to buy tickets? One Greek zoo let a photographer in to document that struggle.

Sign up for our newsletter JPG for more insight into the world of photography — this week we have a great interview with a former soldier and war photojournalist.

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